British Gardening in a WWI Germany

When WWI broke out in Germany after the assassination of the Austrian Archduke Ferdinand of Austria (June 18, 1914), the Germans imprisoned all British men between the ages of 17 and 55—who could potentially become soldiers for England.  Trapped in Germany for 4 years, the men in one camp—the Ruhleben camp—began growing ornamental plants, then vegetables and having gardening competitions.

  • Read more about the Ruhleben camp internees and view photos reported on the Telegraph website.
  • View historical information and maps of the camp—a converted race track—from the Harvard website

 

Resources:

Ruhleben:  The WWI Camp where gardening blossomed. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/10606906/Ruhleben-the-WW1-camp-where-gardening-blossomed.html (Telegraph article accessed March 31, 2014)

Ruhleben:  A Digital Exhibit  http://library.law.harvard.edu/digitalexhibits/ruhleben/exhibits/show/ruhleben/camp-layout/camp-maps (accessed March 31, 2014)

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